Please, accept cookies in order to load the content.

The municipality knows the most diverse details about its inhabitants and its neighborhoods. In short, data enough. But there are several issues where digital information is missing: DATAdeserts. Think, for example, of loneliness or how many people would like to volunteer and what tasks they would like to do.

During the Dutch Design Week, the DATAstudio will go looking for how we can make DATAdeserts visible together with officials, designers, data experts and ordinary citizens. Which digital data and other forms of information gathering are needed to make that possible? How can these hidden subjects be given a voice in both public opinion and municipal policy?

Albert Jan Kruiter (co-founder of the Instituut voor Publieke Waarden) acts as moderator of the design session. The audience will be asked to identify data deserts on the basis of personal stories and come up with concrete proposals for how they should be charted and with whom. Professor Tsjalling Swierstra (Maastricht University) will give feedback on the proposals. 

The design session is organized by the DATAstudio. In the DATAstudio, Het Nieuwe Instituut and the city of Eindhoven work together around the question of how to become a smart society instead of a smart city. Or rather: what do citizens and neighborhoods have to gain from data and technology? The DATAstudio organizes various activities, mainly in the Eindhoven neighborhoods of Woenselse Heide and De Tempel, and provides input for the research program The State of Eindhoven (De Staat van Eindhoven) on the smart city in relation to the participation society.

date
27/10/2016
time
13:30 – 17:00
language
Dutch
 
location

Designhuis
Stadhuisplein 3
5611 EM Eindhoven

entrance

free, please register in advance through the button Tickets below

The State of Eindhoven
Linda Vlassenrood

This project is part of the programme track Partner projects and the folder Research.

The multiyear cultural programme The State of Eindhoven)looks at the changing relationship between government and citizens and, specifically, Eindhoven’s twofold ambition of being a “smart city” in a participatory society.